Next… Develop the design

Next… Develop the design

This post is a continuation of “What’s the Scope and What’s the Cost? How to get to the Design” Now the scope of work has been established, the next step is to design the project. Designing is drawing and discovering and working with the owner to figure out what the project will look like. Drawings are assembled into documents that are then used to tell a story- one of how.

What’s the Scope and What’s the Cost? How to get to the Design

What’s the Scope and What’s the Cost? How to get to the Design

As the economy heats up we’ve found ourselves discussing the design process and what to expect with potential clients repeatedly. We decided it would be good to share some of this information with you. We know many of you want to build or do a remodel but, like most of our clients, have little idea how much it will cost, how to budget for it or how the process works..

Navigating San Francisco Planning Approvals

Navigating San Francisco Planning Approvals

In this post, we respond to the article about San Francisco Planning in the San Francisco Chronicle by John King Tuesday April 4: Architect calls San Francisco planners “obstructive.” Spoiler alert: they’re ticked Hart Wright architects does not bemoan the individual planner doing his or her job. We do agree the process is obstructive to most residents and their architects. For John Rahaim of the San Francisco Planning Department to.

Why Construction Administration matters

Why Construction Administration matters

Construction Administration is one of the services we offer. As we are contracted to be agent of the owner, we use our intimate knowledge of the project, our vision, and our trained eyes to help the contractor solve inevitable problems that arise during construction. A very thorough set of drawings identifies main issues and communicates the intent of the design, but no single set of plans can ever cover everything.

An Argument for Negotiated Bidding

We are often asked by our clients to bid the project to multiple contractors. The argument for this is that they will be able to compare the price offered by the different contractors and go with the lowest price. This is more complicated than it seems because you are not necessarily getting the lowest price when you sign up with the lowest bidder as we will explain below. Multiple bidding.

The Ballpark Estimate: Understanding the Design Process

The Ballpark Estimate: Understanding the Design Process

One of the questions we get often when we begin working with clients is how much will the project cost. There are several ways to determine this, and like the design process, there are many elements involved; the earlier it is in the process, the more schematic the pricing will be. A dollar amount per square foot is one way to help establish a budget. For example, residential costs per.

Bay Area Modern Cottage

Bay Area Modern Cottage

Back in the late 1980s, our clients bought a former workman’s cottage on a flat lot where they lived and raised a family. They enjoyed seeing Mt. Tam from the backyard and could walk to the trails and downtown shops. They discovered over the course of years that the house had an undersized foundation and a too high water table that caused the foundation to deteriorate to the point of.

An outline of the Phases of Architectural Service

1: Interview When you interview your architect you should like them and feel comfortable with them. Since you will be working with them, a lot can be said for how well they communicate and if working together will be a good fit. The architect should have a portfolio of past projects. It is very important to like their work. They will explain their process and you will get a feel.

Pre-construction Services

We are always advocates of getting a contractor signed up early in the process and to provide pre-construction services. (see post “An Argument for Negotiated Bidding”) This method allows for cost control and builds a real team. We strongly believe in the team approach: architects and contractors work together with the owners to complete a project efficiently, on schedule and on budget. It is without adversarial issues that come up,.

Featured on Houzz.com: “Tear Down that Concrete Patio”

Featured on Houzz.com: “Tear Down that Concrete Patio”

Once again, Hart Wright Architects is pleased to announce they are featured on Houzz.com! To read the article, please click the title above.

Our San Francisco Remodel is Featured on Houzz.com

Our San Francisco Remodel is Featured on Houzz.com

Please click

Shell Cost vs. Finish Cost: Understanding Construction Costs Early in the Design Process

Shell Cost vs. Finish Cost: Understanding Construction Costs Early in the Design Process

In our never-ending struggle to explain construction costs to clients, we sometimes resort to the shell cost vs. finish cost estimating method. What is the difference between shell and finish? Finish cost is what most people think of when discussing construction cost. In other words, its the cost of the entire project including all materials from foundation to roof and all exterior and interior finish materials. Finishes are cabinetry, flooring,.

Some Thoughts on Pre-Fab Construction

We have just been asked a question about doing pre-fab construction. What are the pros and cons, and specifically what about doing it in San Francisco? First of all, as far as San Francisco is concerned, our feeling is that since pre-fab gets a lot of press and is still trendy, the San Francisco planning department would not have a problem with it. San Francisco is trying to be green.

Design Case Study: The Knuckle

Here is a brief case study of a remodel where the objective of the project was to add light to the space, make the bedroom bigger, brighter and more functional, and to remodel the bath. Costs were kept down by not moving any plumbing fixtures and the goals were accomplished with some simple non-structural changes to the plan. The existing house had, and still has, extensive overhangs, which is good.

A Green Roof on a Small Scale

A Green Roof on a Small Scale

Here is a utility shed we built to house our gardening tools and trash containers. We designed the shed to break up the deck and patio area from a service alley accessed through the garage. There is a sunny eddy on the deck backed by the shed, the key was placing it perpendicular to the house. Since its roof is so visible and accessible, we wanted to look at plants.